Easter Lily Buds, Here We Go

First Sign of Buds

Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery Blog By: Dawn O'Connor, Jenny Nguyen, & Christina Timm

February 5, 2018 - Jenny watering our Easter Lilies in Northside

February 5, 2018 - Jenny watering our Easter Lilies in Northside

The sun is shining, the snow is melting, and new buds are forming. In our last blog on Easter Lilies, we took you through the growing process leading up to Flower Bud Initiation Week. From planting our bulbs last November and placing them in our cooler, to taking them out of the cooler Early December, then discovering our 100% emergent rate, and lastly leading into the first sight of Flower Bud Initiation.

January 15, 2018 - Northside

January 15, 2018 - Northside

Just a few days after our last blog posting, our growers spotted the start of new root growth for the actual flower bud on January 16. This means we were right on time for stage 2: Flower Bud Initiation Week, which should occur January 10-20.


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Taken at another angle, we can see 3-4 small, white roots forming, just above the soil sitting on the bulb.

With the bulb looking healthy, roots looking strong, and stem roots forming, we are headed in the right direction for healthy Easter Lily plant.

January 16, 2018

Here, Jenny is checking the health of the Easter Lily Bulb. She is also checking for stem which is a sign of bud initiation. There is a very tiny root just above the soil sitting on top of the bulb, to the right of the stem. Stem roots appear around the same time bud differentiation occurs, which is development of the flower components forming after bud initiation.

January 16, 2018

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Once the stem roots were spotted, we then move to stage 3: Visible Bud. Over the next following three weeks bud initiation occurs and the flower bud forms at the base of the stem and over time pushes its way to the top.

This week was especially exciting for us because the first visible sign of flower buds were sighted! We generally like to see at least 5 flower buds on our Easter Lilies. The next and final stage of growing an Easter Lily in 4. Open Flower.

February 6, 2018 - New Buds

February 6, 2018 - New Buds

Here at Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery we are proud to say all our Easter Lilies are homegrown. As part of our growing process, we strive to produce the healthiest product possible, making it available to our customers, and help spread a little spring to our neighbors.

Easter Lilies - Locally Grown Just For You. 

Also, Check out our Easter Lilies Page to see the growing progression starting November 24.

The Easter Lily

Flower Bud Initiation Week

Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery Blog By: Christina Timm

Easter Lilies on January 8

Easter Lilies on January 8

With the increase in temperature this week let’s hope we can steer clear of the below 0 temps. Now is the time of the year we start wishing for warmer weather and hope that spring comes sooner than later. With the coming of spring the ever-traditional Easter Lily is right around the corner and we are excited to share the growing process with you.

 

December 5 - Easter Lilies in Northside

December 5 - Easter Lilies in Northside

Because Easter is much earlier this year then it was last year, the time it takes for the Easter Lilies to grow needs to be taken into consideration. On December 5 we took our Easter Lilies out of the cooler. From there we moved them to Northside, one of our growing greenhouses, to allow them growing time before Easter. Timing and precision is key when growing a plant for a specific holiday. 

December 21 - 100% Emergence

December 21 - 100% Emergence

The Easter Lily grows in four stages: 1. Emergence, 2. Flower Bud Initiation, 3. Visible Bud, and 4. Open Flower.

1. Emergence. Our Easter Lilies emerged around December 20th, 2017 and later found out we had a 100% emergent rate. This is when new growth emerges above the soil with bright green foliage. Seeing the emergence happen before Christmas was really exciting. In the growing world it is very likely to be one or even two seasons ahead of the game. Just to give you an idea of how far ahead it can be, we start planning for our Easter Lilies in June and make sure we have them ordered by July for the following Easter. 

January 8 - Week of flower bud initiation

January 8 - Week of flower bud initiation

2. Flower Bud Initiation. We are now in the week of flower bud initiation. Flower bud initiation takes place approximately between January 10-20. This is when the flower buds are first visible, but are so small you need a magnifying glass to look for them.  This is what we are looking forward to this week.

As our Easter Lilies continue to grow we will keep you posted on bud sightings soon. For more Lily action don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Pre-Spring Lawn and Garden Tips

By: Clara Beaufort from Gardener Gigs

Image via Pixabay

Image via Pixabay

If you want to make sure your yard is safe and ready for children and pets to play in once the warmer weather arrives, now is a good time to start!

There are many things you can do to your lawn and garden in the colder months to lessen your workload when spring comes around. In fact, if you want a yard you can boast about to the whole neighborhood, you have to put in work all year round. Not only will this ensure you have green grass and lush flower beds, but certain maintenance can prevent injuries and accidents in the future.

Here are some home and garden maintenance projects to get done before winter is over.

Tip #1: Check Your Trees and Shrubs

When the spring storms roll in, the last thing you need is a falling branch puncturing a hole in your roof or knocking down a gutter. Inspect all of the trees, shrubs, and bushes on your property for loose limbs and branches. Cut back what you can or consider having them removed if you think they pose a danger. If you can’t do it yourself, a tree-trimming and removal service can do it for you. The average cost for tree and shrub maintenance is $416.

Tip #2: Break Out the Rake

For some people, raking is yard work only for the autumn. However, dead leaves don’t just fall at once, and the blades of grass that die over winter are still there.  Chances are your lawn is suffocating under all the debris. Raking the yard will also help dethatch and aerate your lawn. While a little bit of thatch is okay, more than a half inch is too much for your grass.

Over the winter, we tend to forget about things we left outside when the weather was nicer. Once you get all the nastiness out of the way, you can also inspect the area for toys, sports equipment, fallen decorations—whatever could get in the way when it is finally time to break out the lawn mower.

Tip #3: Winter Fertilize

Throughout the harsh summer months, your lawn loses nutrients. Most lawn-care experts suggest you fertilize in October or November to replenish those nutrients. Those nutrients then sit in the soil and feed the roots of your grass all winter long. If you didn’t fertilize your lawn in the fall before the first snow, now is the time to do it.

Your lawn can still benefit from a late fertilizing. In fact, some lawn-care enthusiasts suggest you fertilize in the fall and again before spring arrives to help your lawn recover from whatever it lost over the freezing temperatures. That way your lawn is properly fed, and you see healthy, lush, green grass in March.

Tip #4: Make It Safe for Play

If your kids have a playground or swingset in the yard, give it a good and thorough check for loose poles, boards, chains, screws, or any other instability that you can fix. Other safety hazards include things like rotting or splitting wood, rusted components, and loose anchoring. Finding these hazards now will give you plenty of time to make necessary adjustments so the whole family can enjoy the yard as soon as the weather warms. You can also help clean off winter dirt and grime with a pressure washer. Be sure to get inside any slides and target any mold or mildew growing on wood surfaces.

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Preparing your lawn and garden for spring means less work to do when the weather is nice. Not only will the work make your grass and flowers look great, but you can help keep your home and family safe as well. Check trees and shrubs for loose branches and cut them down. Rake up winter debris so your lawn can breathe, and consider giving it a light fertilization to replenish what it lost over the season. Finally, if your kids have a playground or swingset in the yard, inspect it now so they don’t have to wait to play on it when the weather finally warms.

Poinsettias: The Ultimate Holiday Gift

Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery Blog By: Christina Timm

Christmas Day Red Poinsettia

Christmas Day Red Poinsettia

Poinsettias, a Timeless Holiday Plant

When you think of the holiday season and what best showcases its beauty, you think of a poinsettia. The poinsettia is a timeless holiday plant that will forever represent the holidays and bring cheer through its leaves.

Christmas Lights Poinsettia

Christmas Lights Poinsettia

Locally Grown Poinsettias

All our poinsettias are grown onsite in two of our many greenhouses. With our team of growers, Dawn and Jenny, led by our Production Manager Ron, we can grow and maintain healthy, full poinsettias.

Grower Dawn hand selecting poinsettias for a wholesale order.

Grower Dawn hand selecting poinsettias for a wholesale order.

The Growing Process

Our poinsettias start off as small cuttings with no roots. We start the growing process by sticking them in the beginning of July and misting them until they establish the start of a good root system. From there they are moved to another greenhouse where they are properly spaced and irrigation tubes are set in place. Here they will be cared for and grown until they are ready to be sold.  

A poinsettia cutting.

A poinsettia cutting.

A Variety of Poinsettias

Every year we hand select the healthiest, most sturdy poinsettias available to make sure our customers are getting the best product possible. So, next time you are looking for a poinsettia, think locally grown, think Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery!

Marbella Poinsettia.

Marbella Poinsettia.

Holiday Centerpieces

Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery Blog By: Christina Timm

Picking Out The Best Centerpiece.

Norway spruce with red berries.

Norway spruce with red berries.

Fresh greens are a great way to add some holiday cheer to your dinner table. Bring the family around something truly inspiring this year. Here are some tips for picking out the best centerpiece and how to maintain its longevity.

First thing you want to think about is how big is your space? Is this for your dining room table or an end table? It's important to measure the space beforehand. With the busy holiday season, it's hard to remember everything, so write it down.

Spruce and White Pine Tips with red berries and a small cardinal.

Spruce and White Pine Tips with red berries and a small cardinal.

Next, make sure the centerpiece you are eyeing up has fresh greens. Our staff at Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery hand make all our centerpieces and hand pick the best greens to ensure you are taking home the best quality centerpiece possible. It is best to buy a centerpiece that isn't browning.  Make sure all your greens are a fresh bright green color!

Spruce and White Pine tips with red berries and pinecones.

Spruce and White Pine tips with red berries and pinecones.

When you find the centerpiece that speaks to you and make it a new addition to your home, it's important to know how to take care of the greens to maintain longevity.

Norway and White Pine tips with a white metal star.

Norway and White Pine tips with a white metal star.

Just like fresh cut flowers like water, fresh cut greens do as well. All our centerpieces are made with aquafoam to hold the greens in place and helps lock in the moisture. It's important to keep your greens well hydrated, watering them every 2-3 days as needed. If you start to see some browning on the greens, remove that portion with a pruners or remove the entire tip, depending on the severity.

Stop by Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery to see more centerpieces before the holidays. Saturday, December 23rd is our last day open for the holiday season!