New Hydrangeas

New Hydrangeas Have Arrived

By: Christina Timm

Hydrangeas are a great way to add colorful, large blooms to any landscape. A hydrangea tree can provide a smaller area with wonderful color in an ornamental tree form. Hydrangea shrubs come in a wide variety of colors and sizes, so choosing one to fit your needs shouldn’t be too hard. Let’s take a closer look at some of the varieties we offer.

keep in mind that all trees and shrubs are available while supplies last. Don’t delay, stop by to see which hydrangea will work in your garden.

Tree Hydrangeas

Quick Fire Hydrangea Tree - Panicle

Quick Fire Hydrangea

Quick Fire Hydrangea

Blooms: Late Summer, first hydrangea to bloom – Beautiful full blooms that starts off white, then turning to shades of pink.

Light: Full sun to part sun

Size: 6-8’ Tall by 6-8’ Wide

Zone: 3-8

Must have: It is the first hydrangea to bloom providing months of color and fall interest.

Limelight Hydrangea Tree - Panicle

Limelight Hydrangea

Limelight Hydrangea

Blooms: Late Summer – Full cone-shaped blooms starting off lime green and budding into white.

Light: Full sun to part sun

Size: 6-8’ Tall by 6-8’ Wide

Zone: 3-9

Must Have: Great ornamental tree that provides wonderful color for any landscape.

Do you have a Hydrangea at home that is not blooming? Learn what could be the problem!

Shrub Hydrangeas

BoBo Hydrangea - paniculata

Bobo Hydrangea

Bobo Hydrangea

Blooms: Late Summer – Profuse amounts of large, white, cone-shaped blooms, turning pink as they age

Light: Full sun to part shade

Size: 2.5-3’ Tall by 3-4’ Wide

Zone: 3-8

Must Have: Its small size helps provide large blooms to an area that can’t accommodate other larger hydrangeas.

Vanilla Strawberry Hydrangea - paniculata

Vanilla Strawberry Hydrangea

Vanilla Strawberry Hydrangea

Blooms: Late Summer – Enormous blooms that start off white, then turn to pink and strawberry red

Light: Full sun

Size: 6-7’ Tall by 4-5’ Wide

Zone: 4-8

Must Have: As it continues to bloom it provides an interesting multicolored effect.

BloomStruck Hydrangea – macrophylla

BloomStruck Hydrangea

BloomStruck Hydrangea

Blooms: All summer Long – Medium-sized blooms starting off lime green and changing from shades of blues and purples.

Light: Full sun to part shade

Size: 3-4’ Tall by 4-5’ Wide

Zone: 4-9

Must Have: Blooms on red showy stems and offer burgundy fall color.

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Let's Talk Hydrangeas

Why aren’t my hydrangeas bloom??

By: Christina Timm

Annabelle Hydrangea

Annabelle Hydrangea

When it comes to hydrangeas, we can all agree that they produce big, beautiful blooms that give off color during the summer. But what does it mean when your hydrangea is not blooming?? Well, it could be a couple things. First, have you trimmed or pruned your hydrangea back as all? Second, do you feed your hydrangea?

Fertilizing

Bone Meal - Please call for availability

Bone Meal - Please call for availability

For maximum blooms it is recommended to fertilize your hydrangeas starting mid-May to mid-August. This will ensure that the plant is getting the right amount of nutrients during the summer for a stronger bloom. Using a granular, slow- release fertilizer with high percentages of phosphorus will get you the greatest results. Bone Meal from Espoma is an all-natural, organic source of Nitrogen and Phosphorus ideal for developing a sturdy root system and promoting plant growth. For hydrangeas it’s the ideal supplement for blooms.

Tip: Be sure not to over fertilize. With any product you use, always read the labels for instructions on when to apply and how much to apply to your hydrangea. Over-fertilizing can result in lush green foliage with little to no blooms.

Shaping or Pruning

Do you have other shrubs, besides hydrangeas, that your not sure when to Prune? Learn the general rule for pruning back other trees and shrubs.

Limelight Hydrangea

Limelight Hydrangea

If allowed the right amount of space to grow, hydrangeas typically don’t need to be pruned. Simply clean up your hydrangea by removing dead branches and spent blooms after it’s done blooming for the season. However, if you are in a situation where your hydrangea is overgrown and unruly, pruning may be a necessary course of action. The key thing to know before you start pruning is what type of hydrangea you have and how it grows. Hydrangeas either grow from new or old wood. New wood – blooms from new growth just that spring. Old wood – blooms from branches as least a year old.

Let’s look at the 3 main types of Hydrangeas that are hardy in Minnesota

Remember it is not necessary to prune back your hydrangea unless it is too large for an area, it’s getting unruly, or you want to shape it.

  1. The Traditional

Arborescens – blooms come from new wood and can be pruned without the worry of losing any blooms.

Annabelle Hydrangea

Annabelle Hydrangea

Growth: The Arborescens Hydrangea are the traditional and most commonly used hydrangea variety. They are known for their big, round, white blooms and soft leafy green foliage. They bloom from new growth each spring.

When to Prune: It is recommended to prune late fall while the shrub enters dormancy or early spring. The Arborescens can be pruned for shaping or to control growth, but it is not necessary.

Tip: Be sure not to prune too early. In doing so the shrub may start to produce new grow before fall arrives. When this happens the first frost can nip new growth and cause problems for the coming spring, potentially causing the shrubs not to bloom.

Common Arborescens Hydrangeas – Annabelle and Incrediball

2. The Cone-Shaped

Paniculata – blooms come from new wood and can be pruned without the worry of about losing any blooms.

Vanilla Strawberry Hydrangea

Vanilla Strawberry Hydrangea

Growth: The Paniculata Hydrangeas offer newer varieties that have been developed to take the guess work out of knowing when to prune for the customer and generally bloom on new wood. Because these Hydrangeas grow on new wood, they can be pruned without having to worry about losing any blooms for the next season.

When to Prune: It is recommended to prune late fall while the shrub enters dormancy or early spring.  Paniculatas can be pruned to shape or control growth or can be cut back by 1/3 of its size. Simply prune back spent flowers, browning stalks, or dead branches to maintain the health of the shrub.

Tip: Be sure not to prune too early. In doing so the shrub may start to produce new grow before fall arrives. When this happens the first frost can nip new growth and cause problems for the coming spring, potentially causing the shrubs not to bloom.

Common Paniculata Hydrangeas: Bobo, Limelight, Quick Fire, and Little Quick Fire.

3. The New Age Color Changing

Macrophylla – blooms coming from old wood and should be pruned lightly after the shrub blooms.

Bloomstruck Hydrangea

Bloomstruck Hydrangea

Growth: The Macrophylla Hydrangeas are also known as the Hydrangeas that are part of the Endless Summer collection. These hydrangeas grow from old wood and can be pruned lightly after the shrub is done blooming to shape and control.

When to Prune: After about 3 years you may notice the blooms beginning to diminish. Here’s how to fix this. Prune back 1/3 of the old wood, working closer to the ground (typically the oldest stalks) each spring. This will encourage new blooms while maintaining the older growth to produce flowers.

Tip: Do not cut all the way back to the ground; in doing so you will not have new blooms for 1-2 years, depending on how long it takes for the shrub to grow back.

Common Macrophylla Hydrangeas: BloomStruck, The Original, and Twist-n-Shout

Looking for a new Hydrangea for your yard, but not sure where to start? Learn more about the varieties we can in store.

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Perennial Grasses

Top 5 Perennial Grasses You Need in Your Garden

By: Christina Timm

Karl Foerster

Karl Foerster

Why is Grass an essential perennial to have in your garden? Because grasses provide great visual texture and offer autumn color during the fall. They are great standalone plants or they can be accented with other flowering perennials. They are also very low-maintenance plants that work great in any landscape area providing enough sun.

Maiden Grass – miscanthus sinensis

Maiden Grass

Maiden Grass

Must Have: This graceful, ornamental grass offers variegated foliage with feathery flower plumes late summer thru fall.

Light: Sun to part shade

Size: about 5-7’ tall and 2’ wide

Bloom: Late summer thru fall

Zone: 4-9

Switch Grass ‘Shenandoah’ – Panicum virgatum

Switch Grass

Switch Grass

Must have: This grass starts off with green blades then changes to wonderful dark red during the summer

Light: Sun

Size: 36” tall and 24” wide

Bloom: Late summer thru fall

Zone: 2-9

Feather Reed Grass ‘Karl Foerster’ – Calamagrostis acutiflora

Karl Foerster

Karl Foerster

Must Have: This grass offers feathery wheat-colored flower plumes blooming through summer and into fall. Most popular and very hardy grass.

Light: Sun

Size: 4-5’ tall and 2’ wide

Bloom: Early summer thru fall

Zone: 4-9

Switch Grass ‘Ruby Ribbons’ – Panicum virgatum

Switch Grass

Switch Grass

Must Have: This grass starts out with deep blue-green foliage that matures into burgundy fall colors.

Light: Sun to part shade

Size: 3-4’ tall and 2-3’ wide

Bloom: Early summer thru late summer

Zone: 4-9

Standing Ovations – Schizachyrium scoparium

Standing Ovations

Standing Ovations

Must Have: This grass starts off with blue foliage and transitions to reddish fall color with a strong upright growth habit.

Light: Sun

Size: 40-48” tall and 12” wide

Bloom: Mid to late summer

Zone: 3-8

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Japanese Beetle Prevention

By Christina Timm

Japanese Beetles

Japanese Beetles

Here are a few ways you can defend your yard against Japanese Beetles. It is recommended to utilize at least two methods of defense to see results. For maximum results, and if you have the time, use all methods of prevention to decrease the Japanese Beetle population.

1.       Mix soapy water into a bucket and start collecting the beetles in reach by dropping them into the mix. The soap creates a sticky film preventing them from flying away.

Japanese Beetle Killer

2.       Japanese Beetle Killer, Neem Oil, or Eight are all sprays that work well on container gardens and ground beds to protect certain annuals and perennials that Japanese Beetles prey on.

Beetle Bagger

 3.       Beetle Bagger, a Bonide product, is great for trapping Japanese Beetles in hard-to-reach areas like taller shrubs and trees that are affected. This product comes with a pheromone drawing the beetles into the bag and trapping them. Bags will need to be replaced once full.

Milky Spore

 

4.       Milky Spore, a St. Gabriel Organics product, is the ultimate prevention in your yard. This granular product can be applied using a spreader on grass, in annual or perennial gardens, and mulch beds. Applying this to your lawn can help with grub control and stop them from developing into beetles. Apply in the early spring or fall time.

If you have additional questions about the Japanese Beetles and what products we carry to help your plants, contact our Garden Center!

 Good Luck!

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Landscaping with Trees

Japanese lilac

by Christina Timm

Plan Before You Plant

Before you begin planting a tree there are a few things to consider when planning for a new tree. With so many different trees to choose from it can be intimidating. Here are a few things to consider making sure you feel confident with the choice that you make.

Purpose:

Maple Tree

What would you like the tree to provide? When thinking about what purpose you want your tree to serve, larger trees like Maple, Birch, and Ginkgo trees can help provide shelter and shade in a larger area. For smaller spaces ornamental trees like Hydrangeas, Lilacs, and Crabapples can help provide the feel of a tree without overtaking the area.

Blooming:

crabapple

Is a blooming tree important? Blooming trees offer beautiful flowers that provide fragrance and inspire nature activity like birds and bees. Flowering trees make great memorial trees for loved ones and can make an unseemly area more attractive. A Cherry Tree or Redbud Tree offer blooms of pink and red for vivid color.

Fruit/Seeds:

Is fruit or seeds too much to clean up? Some trees produce fruit, nuts, or large seeds that are wonderful for wildlife, but are not always desired by homeowners. Each has its own level of clean up. It’s important to find a tree with the right amount of maintenance level for each situation. Most Maple trees produce seeds in various sizes that drop on the lawn.

Wildlife:

Bee on Hydrangea Tree

Bee on Hydrangea Tree

Are birds and other wildlife an interest? Ornamental trees like Crabapples produce small fruit that are essential for birds. Other trees that produce seeds and nuts also provide food for wildlife. Taller trees with more shade can help create shelter for wildlife animals such as birds, squirrels, rabbits, and deer.

Selecting a tree

Once you have considered the many different options a tree has to offer this will help narrow your search. There are three more very important items to consider when making a final decision.

Zone:

Make sure to select a tree that is hardy for MN, which is Zone 4. This means you will be looking for a tree that is hardy enough to withstand -20 to -30 degrees. Any tree that can handle an even lower temperature will be sure to survive our MN winters.

Sun Exposure:

Larger trees will need a full sun area to thrive at its max potential. There are some ornamental trees that can work in a part sun area for small areas close to a home that would be more shaded.

Location:

Evergreen

When selecting a tree make sure to do research and learn the mature size of a potential tree. It is important to a trees development to provide it with enough space to grow properly. Make sure the tree is not planted too close to permanent structures like a home or a garage.

So, there you have it. Everything you need to consider before planting a tree in your yard. Stop by to see what trees we offer or call 763-420-4400 and ask for Donna!