Zinnia

Plant of the Week: Zinnia

By: Christina Timm

Zinnias

Zinnias

Talk about fun, bold color. The Zinnia is a classic summer time blooming flower, but it also holds up well with cooler temperatures as well. We like to add the Zinnia to our fall collection not only because of its hardiness to cooler weather, but also because of the many warm color varieties it offers. Yellow, orange, scarlet, and cherry flowers that continue to bloom throughout the season are hard to pass up. It’s a great mounding plant that provides volume and fills out the center of a fall container garden or ground bed. Pair your Zinnia with purple fountain grass, ornamental pepper, and kale to complete your fall look.

Magellan Cherry

Magellan Cherry

Varieties: Magellan Yellow, Magellan Orange, Magellan Cherry, and Magellan Scarlet

Light: Full to Part Sun

Size: 12-14” tall and 10-12” wide

Plant Type: Summer/Fall Annual

Plant: Filler – fills out the midsection of a container garden or ground bed to provide volume.

Ornamental Kale

Plant of the Week: Ornamental Kale

By: Christina Timm

Ornamental Kale

Ornamental Kale

Now that we are into September and the weather is cooler, a plant that works well this time of the year is…Kale! Ornamental Kale, meaning Kale that is only used for it’s looks and not for eating, is a very low-maintenance plant.

You might be asking yourself why Kale is grown for fall.

 Kale does not like to dry out, so growing it in the summer wouldn’t be the ideal situation. Also, the heat can elongate the stem and diminish the colorful foliage. In fact, cooler temperatures is what makes the center of Kale pop with color. Kale can turn shades of pinks, reds, and purples. Others have white centers.

Kale

Kale

Another name for ornamental Kale is flowering Kale. Did you know that flowering Kale rarely flowers?

 It’s true! Kale is grown as an annual in our location and doesn’t live long enough to be able to produce flowers, if any. The dramatic change in color the foliage takes on in cooler weather is also why it’s called flowering Kale.

Light: Kale prefers full sun (about 5-6 hours)

Water: Make sure to keep your Kale watered. It does not like to get dried out.

Growth: Kale has a medium to slow growth, so buy the size you need. It is a short-lived season depending on the weather.

Kale

Kale

Did you know Kale tolerates frost?

 Yup! Not only does Kale love cooler weather, its foliage says no problem to a little frost.

 Stop by to check out our selection of Ornamental Kale!

Garden Mum

Fall Plant of the Week: The Garden Mum

By: Christina Timm

Garden Mum

When we think of autumn, we think of the garden mum. Why? The color varieties they provide remind us of this season. The yellow mum reminds us of the sunflower; another late blooming flower that helps kick off cooler weather and the change of a new season. The many different shades of orange mums remind us of picking out the right pumpkin for carving. The red and bronze mums remind us of how the trees change their leaf color before winter sets in. Last, but not least, the purple mums remind us of a witch Halloween costume. There are many reasons why mums remind us of autumn, but all are unique to us. Why does the mum make you think of autumn? We would love to read your thoughts in the comments below!

Garden Mum

Light: Full to part sun.

Tip on Lighting: The more intense the sun the faster they will bloom. To get a longer life out of your mum place in partial sun. Be mindful of providing enough light. They will not excel in complete shade.

Water: Every day to every other day.

Tip on Watering:  Your mum will show signs of under watering and over watering by drooping. Check the soil to determine which problem you are having.

Remember: Mums bloom once and then they are done. Their bloom time varies depending on the amount of light they receive, but most will last about a month and a half or two months from start to finish. Once done blooming they will simply turn brown. They will not continue to bloom.

Garden Mum

Garden Mum

Check out the Top 5 Fall Flirty Plants to Try this Fall Season

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Plant of the Week: Pagoda Dogwood Tree

By: Christina Timm

The Pagoda Dogwood Tree is a graceful small tree great for accenting an area in your landscape and creating a backdrop. It’s small tree nature also makes it possible to use as a large shrub. This tree provides beautiful foliage that fills out the tree’s midsection. It’s leaves, while dark-green during spring and summer, turn maroon red in fall. In the spring time you can expect beautiful white-yellow flowers around May followed by blue-black berries that are enjoyed by many different birds.

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Light: Full Sun (6 hours of direct sunlight daily)

Size: 15-20’ Tall by 20-25’ Wide

Zone: 3-7 and hardy to -40 degrees

Special features: It white blooms in the spring provide beauty while its mid-summer fruit provides wildlife entertainment.

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

Succulents

Plant of the Week: Succulents

By: Christina Timm

Succulents

Succulents

Houseplants are all the craze and succulents are no different. Succulents are the cute, little, unique plant that brings a sense of tropical into our home. With so many different colors, textures, and shapes it’s no wonder they are so addicting. Succulents can be planted individually in their own containers or they can be planted up together in a larger container, combining different varieties. Succulents do prefer full sun and can be a very easy plant to take care of once you get to know what they like: lots of sun, allowed to be dried out between watering, and to be enjoyed. They don’t mind a bit of neglect. So sit back and enjoy your little succulents, and love them from afar.

Succulents

Succulents

Succulents

Succulents

Light: Full sun. Succulents like as much sunlight as they can get. In Minnesota sometimes that can be hard. However, placing indoors in a sunny window for 6+ hours will do the trick. If sun is hard to come by, try using a heat lamp. If you start to notice your succulents getting leggy or stretching towards the light this is a sign they are not getting enough.

 Water: Minimal is best! As plant lovers we sometimes love our plants too much, meaning we over care for them. Succulents are okay with a little abandonment. When watering they prefer to dry out between a thorough watering. Think of the desert. It’s hot and dry most of the time, then there is a sudden downpour, and then it’s hot and dry again. This is how watering at home should be like. Just like any plant, succulents do not like to be sitting in water. Make sure when you are watering that your container has proper drainage and that it’s not standing in water. If your succulent is always wet, it is likely to die.

Common Questions:

What type of potting soil should I use for succulents?

The best type of soil to use for succulents is a nice, light soil designed for succulents and cactus. Your favorite local nursery (Lynde) will have soil recommendations you can use. Some people have questioned using sand, and while that might make sense seeing how they come from the desert, succulents do need additional nutrients that a potting mix can provide. Be cautious not to use all sand. With continued watering sand can compact and become very heavy.

 Why are the leaves falling off my succulent?

It is perfectly natural for the bottom leaves to shrivel and fall off, just like any other houseplant. If more leaves start to fall off it may be caused by too much watering or a type of bug that is causing damage.

If you are interested in planting up some succulents, join us for our Succulent Bar Saturday on September 7th at 10 am

Succulent Bar Saturday on September 14 at 1 pm

Rudbeckia

Plant of the Week: Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’

Black-Eyed Susan

By: Christina Timm

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

The perennial Rudbeckia also known as the Black-Eyed Susan offers warm yellow color from mid-summer and well into fall. These daisy-like flowers attract various pollinators making them a great plant to add to your garden to help sustain pollinating activity. They grow excellent in full sun creating a blanket of yellow when planted in mass quantity. They can also be used for fresh cut flowers in a vase with zinnias, hydrangeas, or any other late summer blooming plant. Their unique fuzzy foliage makes them deer resistant, as if you needed another great perk to add the Rudbeckia to your garden!

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Stats

Light: Full Sun to Part Sun

Water: Keep soil evenly moist

Size: 24” Tall and 24” Wide

Bloom Season: Midsummer thru fall

Perk: Deer resistant and helps pollinators

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Looking for more pollinator plant?? Check out other pollinator plants here!

Sunflower

Plant of the Week: Suntastic Sunflower

By: Christina Timm

Suntastic Sunflower

Suntastic Sunflower

If there is one thing you know about the sunflower, it’s that it makes you smile with its bright yellow color. The great thing about the Suntastic Sunflower is you can easily grow a sunflower in your home. Although sunflowers generally prefer to be outside with their amazing height and large multi-petaled flower, this sunflower is a shorter variety making it versatile. Because this happy plant only reaches about 14” tall it can be grown in a small container for a patio or to be enjoyed indoors. Also, this sunflower produces not one, not two, but anywhere from 4-5 flowers on one stem. Like you needed another reason to buy this happy, yellow plant!

Suntastic Sunflower

Suntastic Sunflower

Stats

Light: Full sun

Water: Keep soil evenly moist

Size: About 14” Tall and 10” Wide

Bloom Season: Late Summer to Fall

Growing Care: Unlike traditional sunflowers the Suntastic Sunflower offers 4-5 flowers per stem.

Check out the Latest Blog and Discover Something New!

Northern Catalpa

Plant of the Week: Northern Catalpa

By: Christina Timm

Northern Catalpa

Northern Catalpa

This fast-growing tree offers large heart-shaped leaves, white blooms come June, and hanging seed pods creating a ‘raining’ look. This tree can grow anywhere from 13” to 24” per year. It has the unique quality of developing twisted branches and trunk. Although, it is not expected to begin blooming for about 7 years after planted, when it does bloom it is enjoyed by hummingbirds. This tree is the sole host of the catalpa sphinx moth. The flowers and seed pods produced by this tree can be slippery and should not be planted near sidewalks. This tree does require cleanup after it is done blooming and sheds its pods.

Find out if the Northern Catalpa is right for you! Check out our Blog on Landscaping with trees!

Northern Catalpa

Northern Catalpa

 

Stats

Light: Full sun

Size: 35-40’ tall X 50-60’ wide

Zone: 4-7

Special Features: Blooms in June with showy white flowers that attract hummingbirds.

Read the Latest Blog!

My Monet Dwarf Weigela

By Christina Timm

Plant of the Week: My Monet Dwarf Weigela

My Monet Dwarf Weigela

My Monet Dwarf Weigela

The My Monet Dwarf Weigela is great for borders or mass plantings. This shrub maintains a compact shape only getting about 1 and a half feet tall. It offers variegated foliage with shades of green, hints of pink, and a creamy edge. Be sure to look for soft pink blooms late spring and into summer. If pruning is desired, it is best that you wait until after the shrub has flowered. This shrub is great for low maintained gardens requiring little care.

My Monet Dwarf Weigela

My Monet Dwarf Weigela

Stats

Light: Sun or part shade 5 hours of sun is recommended

Size: 1-1.5’ tall and 1.5-2 wide

Zone: 4-6 Hardy to -30 degrees

Special Features: Attracts Butterflies and hummingbirds.

See Our Latest Blog

ZZ Plant

This Week Plant of the the Week: The ZZ Plant

By: Christina Timm

zz plant

zz plant

Also known as the Zanzibar Gem or by its scientific name Zamioculcas zamiifolia, the ZZ Plant is trending everywhere on social media. Just like many houseplants gaining popularity through Instagram the ZZ Plant is no different. With its hardy nature and shiny foliage, the ZZ Plant is loved for its easy qualities. It’s the perfect plant for new plant parents, because it is very forgiving.

zz plant

Size: This plant has the potential of achieving 3-4’ tall with a medium to slow growth rate. The growth rate will depend on the lighting.

Light: This plant will excel well in a lot of bright light but can tolerate very low light. This is one of the many perks of having a ZZ Plant if you have an area with very little light. With the plant being in low light it will grow a little slower than if it were in more bright light.

Watering: Easy does it. The ZZ Plant does not need an excessive amount of water. One of its unique features is its rhizomes that store a lot of nutrients and water for the plant to feed off. Rhizomes are underground root systems that produce new growth for the plant. If these rhizomes get over-watered, they have the potential of rotting out and virtually doing irreversible damage to the plant.

Worth Mentioning: This plant has a natural shine to it so it is not necessary to add leaf shine to its leaves; doing so could clog its pores.

Check Out the Plant of the Week From Previous Weeks

Garden Phlox

This Plant of the Week: Garden Phlox

by Christina Timm

Garden Phlox

Garden Phlox

About

The Garden Phlox is a native plant to the United States that offers a mass of color and a long blooming season. With your choice of just about any color the Garden Phlox is popular for its billowy blooms that holds its color during the summer and well into the early fall time. Their five petaled flowers fan out in multi-clustered blooms creating a large flower head much like a hydrangea. You can look forward to blooms showing color in July, lasting well into September.

Garden Phlox

Garden Phlox

Stats

Light: Full Sun Exposure

Size: Depending on the variety, anywhere from 12”-36” tall and 12” to 20” wide

Zone: 4-9

Wildlife: Attracts birds and butterflies

Cons: They can be enjoyed by deer or rabbits

Read the Latest from our Blog

Petunia

This Weeks Plant of the Week: Petunia

by Christina Timm

Blueberry Swirl

Blueberry Swirl

About the Petunia

The Petunia is a summer annual in Minnesota. It’s the perfect summer flower because it tolerates full sun and our intense summer heat. They have a mounding growing habit that increases the volume in a container garden or ground bed. When placed in a container garden, like a patio pot or hanging basket, the Petunia will trail offering a cascade of vivid color that will spill over the edge of a container.

Red Petunia

Red Petunia

The pro to having a Petunia in your garden is the overall lush blooms and foliage all summer long. When properly fed and cared for this plant will offer bloom after bloom of color. With all these blooms it is recommended to keep up on deadheading this plant. This will ensure the overall health and continued new growth.

Light: Full sun

Water: Keep evenly watered and be sure not to over water.

Bloom Season: Spring-Autumn

Growing Care: Haircuts can give your Petunia new life. Simply use scissors to evenly cut around your container garden.

See what Petunias we have in store!

While Supplies Last!

Now $5.49

Pink Sky

Pink Sky

Raspberry Swirl

Raspberry Swirl

Night Sky

Night Sky

Cascadias Indian Summer

Cascadias Indian Summer

Cascadias Rim Magenta

Cascadias Rim Magenta

Blueberry Swirl

Blueberry Swirl

Black Magic

Black Magic

Supertunia Bordeaux

Supertunia Bordeaux

See more Plants of the Week!

Azalea

This Weeks Plant of the Week: Azalea

by Christina Timm

About:

The Azalea is a great spring blooming plant that comes in a variety of colors. They are typically the first to bloom in the garden and offer mass color. Their showy clusters of flowers come in white, yellow, orange, pink, and red. They are a compact shrub, most only achieving about 4-5 feet in height and width.

All Azaleas are deciduous meaning they lose their leaves in the fall time and re-bloom in the spring time. Most can handle a full day’s sun, but they are tolerable to partial shade. The Azalea is a great accent shrub against a house with lower growing perennials planting in front, out in a garden offering spring interest, or they can make great memorial shrubs.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Growth: 4-5’ tall and 4-5’ wide

Zone: 4-7 MN Hardy for around -30 degrees

Varieties of Azaleas we Offer in our store:

While Supplies Last!

Northern Hi-Lights Azalea

Creamy white blooms with yellow centers.

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Mandarin Lights Azalea

Orange flowers with red dots covering the blooms in the spring.

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Northern Lights Azalea

Provides shades of light pinks and dark pinks.

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Mollis Azalea

Ranges from a variety of colors: cream, yellow, orange, and red orange.

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Tri-Lights Azalea

White blooms with hints of pink and have yellow centers.

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Read the Latest from our Blog

Bromeliads

This Weeks Plant of the Week: Bromeliads

by Christina Timm

The Bromeliads are great plants to keep indoor where there is a lot of light, but no true direct light. They are native in American jungles and dwell alongside Orchids in trees or on forest floors. They have very tiny root systems so over-potting (mean re-potting into a large container) or over watering can be fatal to the plants health. The Bromeliad should never need to be re-potted.

Bromeliad

Temperature: In order for this plant to bloom place it in a 75 degree area or higher. 50 degrees is sufficient for the foliage.

Light: Loves bright light, but away from direct sunlight.

Water: Never over water. Fill the center of the plant with rainwater. Empty and replace every 1-2 months.

Air Type: Prefers to be misted, absorbing nutrition through it's leaves.

Re-potting: Rarely necessary.

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The Bromeliads do require patience and skill when a flower is desired. The plant itself is easy to take care of with broad leathery leafs, but getting it to bloom requires a lot of warmth. The foliage desires to be at 50 degrees or higher, but blooms enjoy 75 degrees or higher!

See More Plants of the Week